The Crisis Planner

A Community Dedicated to Providing Guidance to Create Your Personal and Natural Disaster Plans

Celebrating The Everyday Hero

hero-clip-art-875045There are heroes all around us.

I am not referring to the sports icons or celebs that dominate the media.  I am talking about the everyday heroes that prove to me that there truly are good people in the world.  These are the people that rush to the danger rather than away from it.  When everyone else is frozen with fear and uncertainty they leap in and change the outcome for those in danger.  They are special because not everyone would do what they do.  They are special because they are the true heroes around us.

They do not shout their heroic deeds from the rooftops.  They do not seek the limelight or media attention they so rightly deserve.  If you call them a hero they humbly decline the label and tell  you they only did what anyone would do.  They did not do anything out of the ordinary.  Yet, to those of us who see what they did, we recognize that they are special.

I met a young man the other day.  His arm in a cast.  He was introduced to the group, substituting for his mom to give a short presentation.  His mom was still in rehab recovering from a horrific car accident.  He had been in the car with his mom.  The car burst into flames, his mom was trapped in the burning car.  His arm was injured, yet he used all his strength to pull her from the burning car, while others just stood by and watched.  As he struggled for what seemed an eternity, the flames increasing in intensity, finally others assisted him.  This young man at 19 was articulate, confident, and humble in front of the group of 50.  He didn’t think he did anything special.  He didn’t think he was a hero.  Yet he was, to his mom and to the crowd.  He is also autistic and for 19 years his mom was his hero.  On this day he was able to be a hero for his mom.  His story is special.  He is an everyday hero.download (5)

Just this weekend, three young Americans traveling on a train in France became everyday heroes.  They took down a terrorist on the train.  With no concern for their own safety, they intervened, and prevented what would have been a bloody terrorist attack.  They were on that car by accident as they had originally been seated in another car.  Their military training helped them recognize the danger and take immediate action.  Their humility as they received medals from the President of France and media attention was typical of everyday heroes.

In two weeks we will recognize many more everyday heroes as we pass another anniversary of 9-11.  The firefighters, police and others who sacrificed their lives on that day will be remembered for their heroic deeds of that tragic day.  They ran to the danger to help others escape.  Some will say they were only doing their jobs.  Yes, they were doing their jobs, a job that most would never consider doing for fear of their own safety.  They put their lives on the line for you and me without fear or regret.  They are my heroes.

thank-you-road-sign

 

I want to say thank you to all the everyday heroes among us.

I am grateful to know you and to hear your stories.

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!

Linda Fostek

The Crisis Planner

 

 

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